“Magic mirror on the wall” ?

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Cassiana Pozzi, Entertainment editor

     Ask anyone to recite the most popular line from Disney’s Snow White and the Seven Dwarves. If they respond with “Mirror mirror on the wall who’s the fairest of them all?” they will be wrong. The real line, said by the Evil Queen, from the Disney classic is actually “Magic mirror on the wall,” and this isn’t the only case. The Mandela Effect is a term for when a large group of people all remember the same detail or event even though it never happened or was never like that. The Mandela Effect got it’s name when a large group of people all remembered Nelson Mandela dying in the 80’s before his actual death in 2013.

     There are so many examples of this affecting millions of people and it has even started an uproar on social media. The most popular one is the Bernstain Bears example; people remember the well-known children’s book being Bernstein Bears even though copies now are titled Bernstain Bears. Another example is from Star Wars: Episode V–Empire Strikes Back when Darth Vadar revealed the biggest plot twist in cinematic history, he was Luke Skywalker’s father. The famous line is remembered as “Luke, I am your father.” But, going back to the classic sci-fi movie, the line is “No, I am your father.” And there are more lines from famous movies that are somehow changed or just never existed. Another example is from the horror classic Silence of the Lambs. Hannibal Lecter has never said the line, “Hello Clarice.” which is one of the most famous lines from the character. And remember the famous line from the film Forrest Gump: “Life is like a box of chocolates”? That isn’t the line. Tom Hanks’ character actually said: “Life was like a box of chocolates”.

     Other examples of the Mandela Effect that make people question a lot of things are KitKat never having a dash in the product’s name, the popular cartoon Looney Toones was always spelled Looney Tunes, and people remembering Chick-fil-a as Chic-fil-a. Even the little guy on the boxes of Monopoly games is mis-remembered; he has never had a monocle, which is the small, single eyeglass. There have been people who dressed up as the Monopoly man for Halloween wearing a monocle, because that’s how people remember him.

     No one will ever be able to prove whether or not there was a change in time to set these events or memories off course, but until then more Mandela Effects will surface to question if such things have always been the way they are.