Best and Worst Super Bowl Commercials

Best and Worst Super Bowl Commercials

Will Sieracki, Reporter

  Super Bowl 51 came and went, and with it were insanely expensive commercials. Companies paid up to $5 million for a 30-second spot, which is unbelievable. But the ads are well worth it, as they advertise the product or company to more than 100 million people every year. They’re memorable, whether they’re funny or thought-provoking.

 

     A lot of them were controversial, such as Audi’s ad for the big game. It shows a father watching his daughter compete in a race, and he begins to think about the supposed “wage gap.” The narrator asks, “What do I tell my daughter?” The commercial has polarized people, with it being praised by media outlets such as CNN, while being criticised heavily by YouTube users, where the commercial has more dislikes than likes, and commenters saying things like “This whole commercial is based off a lie. Women don’t make less than men. Total propaganda.”

 

     Lumber 84’s ad chronicles a young Mexican girl and her mother trying to get to the United States illegally; by foot, in a boxcar train, and by sitting in the back of a truck. The full commercial was rejected by FOX, so the broadcast version was edited to tell viewers to go to the Lumber 84 website to see the end of the story. When viewers went to the now constantly crashing website, they saw an emotional conclusion. The mother and daughter approach a huge wall on the border, and the mother begins to panic. The daughter reaches into her backpack and pulls out a tattered, beaten American flag made out of scraps she had been picking up along the way. It seems like the situation is hopeless, but when the two people start to walk along the wall, they find a door made out of Lumber 84 wood. They walk through the door, and the message “The will to succeed is always welcome here.” is shown.
     They weren’t all political, though. Snickers tried a live Super Bowl commercial, rather than a pre-recorded one. It was one of the worst ads shown during the big game, because it wasn’t funny or moving. It was just there, taking up ad space. So, they weren’t all good, either. But it gets names out for millions to see, and there’s no such thing as bad publicity,